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Four things you need to know about Jeremy Corbyn's speech

September 29, 2016 1:42 PM
Originally published by UK Liberal Democrats

Jeremy Corbyn (By YouTube/exadverso [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)Today and Labour party conference, Jeremy Corbyn gave his speech to Labour party conference - and it made one thing abundantly clear - the Liberal Democrats are the only pro-European party now.

Here's the four things, you need to know about Jeremy Corbyn's speech:

1. Corbyn's Labour won't fight for membership of the Single Market:

Jeremy Corbyn confirmed he won't fight for Britain's membership of the Single Market. He called for "access" to the European market, and for new powers to intervene in the economy that wouldn't be compatible with the rules of the Single Market. The Liberal Democrats are the only UK party fighting to protect the UK economy by preserving our membership of the Single Market.

2. Corbyn's Labour still no plan including for the NHS:

There were no major policy announcements in Corbyn's speech. The proposed 1.5% increase in corporation tax would only raise around £1.2 billion in its first year, hardly enough to tackle the huge cash crisis facing our NHS. The only sensible policies Corbyn did propose were longstanding Lib Dem policies, including lifting the borrowing cap for local authorities, a ban on arms sales to Saudi Arabia and boosting the pupil premium, which was described by Education Secretary John Denham in 2010 as "a con".

3. Corbyn's Labour is divided:

The only Labour politicians mentioned in Corbyn's speech were Owen Smith, Debbie Abrahams and Gordon Brown. He didn't mention Blair, or any other leading figures including Yvette Cooper, Chuka Umunna or Tom Watson. Corbyn is failing to build bridges with the rest of his party, meaning Labour is still too divided to provide a strong opposition.

4. Corbyn's Labour won't win a majority again:

Corbyn only mentioned Scotland once in a passing mention, even though Labour must win back Scotland if it is to ever have a chance of gaining a majority again. The Liberal Democrats are the only party that can stop a Tory majority government at the next election.